UI

Figma User Interface

Here are two (2) suggestions for Figma Designer to help make it a bit more user-friendly and magical to use.

Panel Expand / Collapse Animations

When toggling "Hide UI", the interface abruptly disappears and reappears (on the right side of Fig. 1a. ) 

It'd be delightful if the UI elements were swept away (dark green position graph) from the center of the screen and subtly faded out of sight. (light green opacity graph) as indicated below in Fig. 1b.

Fig. 1a.

Fig. 1a.

Fig. 1b.

Responsive Panel Colors

Figma thankfully allows users to set a background color for the whole project, which is a welcomed feature coming from Sketch, which locks you into using a white background. 

Unfortunately when using a dark background, the layers panel (left sidebar) and the inspector panel (right sidebar) are blindingly bright. Not only are they pure white, their typefaces and elements are thin and light.

To make the layer and inspector panels more readable, I propose that the UI of both change in accordance to the set background color of the project. I prototyped what this could look like in the column on the right. 

Screen Shot 2017-08-11 at 11.41.09 AM.png

Glassdoor

Here are some feature requests and interface mockups for glassdoor.com, a site designed to assist job-seekers by making companies and salaries more transparent.

On this page:
- Search Histogram
- Wage Gap Analysis

Salaries > Search Results > Show Histogram

Replacing the horizontal bar with a histogram serves both an aesthetic and pragmatic purpose. Histograms are prettier, universally understood, and allow the user to recognize patterns. (i.e. entry level positions in your city are significantly lower than the national average entry level position, but the mean salary is comparable to the national average)

User interface mockup: 1) show distribution histogram of submitted salaries, 2) reveal salary with cursor hover.

Companies & Reviews > Company Info > Wage Gap

Transparency is good. Sometimes transparency seems bad, but that's only when it reveals the bad stuff hiding beneath the surface. To read about the benefits and dangers of increased wage transparency, check out this article about Buffer's transparency initiative.

This feature, if it could be properly executed, would illustrate the wage gap between the lowest paid worker and the highest paid executives. Submitted salaries (green)  would be compared to the estimated pay of the highest paid executives based on variables including (1) yearly earnings of the company (this field could be crowdsourced, for users who want to do some digging online) and (2) CEO-worker pay gap in respective country, state, or other district where this data is readily available.